MIND-BOGGLING, MULTI-GENERATIONAL PLANNING: 31,104 Verses in the Holy Bible

The first edition of the King James Bible, which was edited by Francis Bacon and prepared under Masonic supervision, bears more Mason’s marks than the Cathedral of Strasburg.

Manly P. Hall, Rosicrucian and Masonic Origins

 

This is a portrait of Robert Estienne, who numbered the chapters and verses of the Bible. He was a progeny of Jove.

31,104 Verses in the Holy Bible


What you are about to read should startle you. It boggles the mind to think about the level of effort involved. Image planning 31,104 verses so that you end up with things like Matthew 24, Isaiah 24 (the “little apocalypse”), Revelation 13:18, and countless other examples of chapter and verse numbers imbued with meaning, many of which are discussed on this website.

The 1560 Geneva Bible was printed over a millennium after the biblical canons were established. How many of those years were required to design the chapter and verse numbers in the Bible? 100? 500? Was it the work of one man or generations of men? We may never know the answers to these questions.

The math is simple, but why is the question?

216 x 144 = 31,104

And there are 31,104 verses in the Bible

Wikipedia says there are 31,102 verses, but they are using the BlueLetterBible.org and BibleBelievers.com websites as their authorities on this subject. The analysis on both of these websites is faulty. And that is damn near unforgivably shoddy work on the part of Wikipedia and these would-be authoritative websites because I can think of few subjects more important than this.

If there are in fact 31,104 verses in the Bible, what that is telling us beyond any shadow of a doubt is that these two numbers are of inestimable importance to humanity.

The King James versions of the Bible from which Wikipedia is deriving their verse counts are missing two verses, 3 John 15 and Revelation 12:18.

Here you see in the King James Version that “Peace be to thee. Our friends salute thee. Greet the friends by name.” is included in 3 John 14. This is not the case in other Bibles. I only use two Bibles: the Authorized King James Version and “George M. Lamsa’s Translation from the Aramaic of the Peshitta.” Lamsa also has this final greeting as a separate verse.

14 However I trust I shall shortly see you, and we shall speak face to face.
15 Peace be to you. Our friends salute you. Salute the friends every one by his name.

For a complete list of Bible versions that include 3 John 1:15 click here. There are at least 35 such versions.

The second “missing” verse from the King James versions of the Bible (from which Wikipedia derives the 31,102 verses count) is Revelation 12:18. There is no such verse in those versions.

The first Bible in English to use both chapters and verses was the Geneva Bible published shortly afterwards in 1560. These verse divisions soon gained acceptance as a standard way to notate verses, and have since been used in nearly all English Bibles and the vast majority of those in other languages.

Wikipedia, Chapters and verses of the Bible

The Geneva Bible is one of the most historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James Version by 51 years. It was the primary Bible of 16th-century English Protestantism and was used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan, author of The Pilgrim’s Progress (1678). It was one of the Bibles taken to America on the Mayflower (Pilgrim Hall Museum has collected several Bibles of Mayflower passengers). The Geneva Bible was used by many English Dissenters, and it was still respected by Oliver Cromwell’s soldiers at the time of the English Civil War, in the booklet “Cromwell’s Soldiers’ Pocket Bible”.

This version of the Bible is significant because, for the very first time, a mechanically printed, mass-produced Bible was made available directly to the general public which came with a variety of scriptural study guides and aids (collectively called an apparatus), which included verse citations that allow the reader to cross-reference one verse with numerous relevant verses in the rest of the Bible, introductions to each book of the Bible that acted to summarize all of the material that each book would cover, maps, tables, woodcut illustrations and indices.

Wikipedia, Geneva Bible

The Geneva Bible set the standard for chapter and verse numbers and it did include Revelation 12:18.

For a complete list of Bible versions that include Revelation 12:18 click here. There are at least 31 such versions. I can offer no explanation as to why some versions of the Bible added 3 John 15. It was not included in the Geneva Bible.

The “re-Ver(sing) Verses” website discusses 3 John 15 at length. The Bible.org website has a very thorough analysis of the Third Epistle of John (Wikipedia completely ignores the issue) at 17. Exegetical Commentary on 3 John 1-15. In it the final greeting of John to Gaius is regarded as clearly distinct from the rest of the letter. This I think must be why many versions of the Bible include 3 John 15 as a separate verse for the final greeting. Doing so is consistent with 2 John 13 and many other letters in the New Testament that have separate verses for the final greetings such as “Peace be to you. Our friends salute you. Salute the friends every one by his name.” in the Third Epistle of John. Given my particular interest in this subject, it would be very telling to know which was the first Bible to separate this final greeting into 3 John 15.