ELIZABETHAN ENGLAND: The life of Sir Francis Bacon after his feigned death on April 9, 1626

St Michaels Church in St. Albans, the burial place o Sir Francis Bacon, is purely symbolic. According to Wikipedia, it is “the most significant surviving Anglo-Saxon building in the county…The building includes much Roman material salvaged from the surrounding ruins of Verulamium, including Roman brick used in the splays of the nave windows.” “St Albans” has a simple English gematria of 88. The 24-letter Elizabethan England gematria for St Albans is 83, the 23rd prime. This numeric symbolism is continued with “St Michael’s Church.” It has a value of 71 in the Pythagoras cipher, and 163 in Elizabethan England gematria. 163 blocks off 36 cells in the prime table. Moreover, Wikipedia states, “Saint Alban…is venerated as the first-recorded British Christian martyr, for which reason he is considered to be the British protomartyr.” This rabbit hole has no bottom, though. St Albans was protecting Amphibalus, “a Roman Christian fleeing religious persecution under Emperor Diocletian.” “Amphibalus” has an Elizabethan England cipher of 97, the 25th prime, commonly used as a substitute for the Rosicrucian signature of 55 because the 25th prime blocks off two rows of five cells.

 

Immanuel Velikovsky, without whom we would know nothing.

PART I. REWRITTEN TEXT FOR leonardodvinci.tv


If you are reading this, the entire research paper consists of Cut & Pastes from older work. As a reminder, this is all the author may be able to do before the end. The Cut & Paste section that follows IS ALWAYS EXPANDED SEQUENTIALLY so that the newest additions are at the very bottom of the page.

 

 

WARNING: Possible minefield ahead

 

Zeus

PART II. CUT & PASTE


What follows are fragments of text pulled from older versions of the author’s work, sometimes WRITTEN IN THE FIRST PERSON. These fragments vary anywhere from a brief note to entire sections. Please remember that each Cut & Paste is from OLD, UNEDITED WORK that may include anything from inadvertent errors to DANGEROUSLY MISLEADING CONCLUSIONS that desperately need to be rewritten. “For precept must be upon precept, precept upon precept; line upon line, line upon line; here a little, and there a little.” The reader must exercise some beyond this point.

 

 


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One of the truly great minds of that secret fraternity—in fact, the moving spirit of the whole enterprise-was Sir Francis Bacon, whose prophecy of the coming age forms the theme of his New Atlantis and whose vision of the reformation of knowledge finds expression in the Novum Organum Scientiarum, the new organ of science or thought. In the engraving at the beginning of the latter volume may be seen the little ship of progressivism sailing out between the Pillars of Galen and Avicenna, venturing forth beyond the imaginary pillars of church and state upon the unknown sea of human liberty. It is significant that Bacon was appointed by the British Crown to protect its interests in the new American Colonies beyond the sea. We find him writing of this new land, dreaming of the day when a new world and a new government of the philosophic elect should be established there, and scheming to consummate that end when the time should be ripe. Upon the title page of the 1640 edition of Bacon’s Advancement of Learning is a Latin motto to the effect that he was the third great mind since Plato. Bacon was a member of the same group to which Sir Walter Raleigh belonged, but Bacon’s position as Lord High Chancellor protected him from Raleigh’s fate. Every effort was made, however, to humiliate and discredit him. At last, in the sixty-sixth year of his life, having completed the work which held him in England, Bacon feigned death and passed over into Germany, there to guide the destinies of his philosophic and political fraternity for nearly twenty-five years before his actual demise.

Manly P. Hall, Rosicrucian and Masonic Origins. From Lectures on Ancient Philosophy—An Introduction to the Study and Application of Rational Procedure: The Hall Publishing Company, Los Angeles, First Edition 1929, Chapter 19


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Allegorical painting of Queen Elizabeth I with figures symbolizing Father Time and Death (c. 1610) [Credit: Wikimedia Commons]

 

Research Notes


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