NUMBER 51 (May 1st): Treaty of Edinburgh–Northampton

Edward III signed the Treaty of Edinburgh–Northampton on May 1, 1328. The Knights Templar fled France in 1312. This is only 16 years later. The banking class has failed in its first attempt to control the world financially and is preparing for a much longer stay in Scottland.

In 1320, the Declaration of Arbroath was sent by a group of Scottish nobles to the Pope affirming Scottish independence from England. Two similar declarations were also sent by the nobles, clergy and Robert I. In 1324, Thomas Randolph, Earl of Moray was sent to meet the Pope in person at his court in Avignon. Randoph successfully persuaded Pope John to recognise Robert as King of Scots, a major diplomatic coup. In 1327, Edward II of England was deposed and killed and his son Edward III of England assumed the throne. Repeated invasions of the north of England by Robert or his war leaders, culminating in the Battle of Stanhope Park, in which the English king was nearly captured, forced Edward III to sign the Treaty of Edinburgh–Northampton on 1 May 1328. This recognised the independence of Scotland and Robert the Bruce as King. To further seal the peace, Robert’s son and heir David married the sister of Edward III.

Wikipedia, Wars of Scottish Independence

How is it that the simple English gematria for “banker” in the 26-letter alphabet of Modern English is a date the banker’s hold dear? Divine intervention? I would agree had I not been doing this longer than the reader. More likely, this explains why the Treaty of Edinburgh–Northampton was signed on May 1. How far down the road the Ћinkers plan ahead is mind-boggling.

May 1, 1776, Adam Weishaupt and the Order of the Illuminati in Germany


A central question here is where does the knowledge reside, Germany or England, or is there a difference? Full text of “New England and the Bavarian Illuminati” He has an annoyingly arrogant and condescending tone towards ______ For example… “imagined peril on account of his clashings with the Jesuits” p. 158 1 The suppression of the Jesuits by Pope Clement XIV, in 1773, did not greatly diminish the influence and power of the order in Bavaria. Refusing to accept defeat, the new intrigues to which they gave themselves inspired in their enemies a new sense of their cohesion, with the result that they appeared even more formidable than before their suppression. p. 144 Meantime the Jesuits, observing with deep resentment Weishaupt’s meteoric rise, 1 together with a growing disposition on his part to voice unrestrained criticism of ecclesiastical intolerance and bigotry, entered into intrigues to checkmate his influence and undermine his position. 2 The payment of his salary was protested and the notion that he was a dangerous free-thinker industriously disseminated. p148 He was w Freemason eight years before joining the Order of the Illuminati p. 163 Two weighty consequences promptly followed as the result of [Baron Adolf Franz Friederich] Knigge’s advent into the order. The long-sought higher grades were worked out, and an alliance between the Illuminati and Freemasonry was effected. 1 1 Weishaupt himself, overcoming his earlier antipathy to Freemasonry, had joined the Masons at Munich, in 1777, influenced particularly by his desire to find suggestions for the working out of the higher grades of his order. Out of this connection, and under the persuasion of Zwack, the plan of forming an alliance between the Illuminati and Freemasonry had occurred to Weishaupt’s mind before Knigge joined the order. One Masonic lodge, that of Theodore of Good Counsel, located at Munich, had, by the middle of 1779, come so completely under the influence of members of the Illuminati that it had come to be regarded as a part of the order. Cf. Forestier, p. 200. But here again the situation waited upon the energetic leadership of Knigge. p. 166-167 The inferior grades of the order were territorially grouped together into prefectures, and upon these the authority of the Illuminatus Dirigens was imposed. Each Illuminatus Dirigens had a certain number of Minerval assemblies and lodges assigned to him, and for the welfare of these he was responsible to the superiors of the order. The members of this grade constituted the ” Sacred Secret Chapter of the Scottish Knights,” from which issued the patents of constitution for the organization of new lodges. 1 1 The Chapter was placed under obligation to see that Blue Lodges, not to exceed thirty all told, were established in all the important centers of its district. They had also to see that the Order of the Illuminati secretly obtained a preponderating influence in the lodges of other systems, to reform them if possible, or, failing in this, to ruin them. A Prefect, or Local Superior, who furnished regular reports to his superiors, presided over the Chapter. Cf. Forestier, pp. 279-281. p. 170 – 173 The new method of spreading Illuminism by means of its affiliation with Masonic lodges promptly demonstrated its worth. Largely because of the fine strategy of seeking its recruits among the officers and other influential personages in the lodges of Freemasonry, one after another of the latter in quick succession went over to the new system. 1 New prefectures were established, new provinces organized, and Provincials began to report a steady and copious stream of new recruits. 2 From Bavaria into the upper and lower Rhenish provinces the order spread into Suabia, Franconia, Westphalia, Upper and Lower Saxony, and outside of Germany into Austria 3 and Switzerland. Within a few months after Knigge rescued the order from the moribund condition in which he found it, the leaders were able to rejoice in the accession of three hundred members, many of whom by their membership immensely enhanced the prestige of the order. Students, merchants, doctors, pharmacists, lawyers, judges, professors in gymnasia and universities, preceptors, civil officers, pastors, priests all were generously represented among the new recruits. 1 Distinguished names soon appeared upon the rosters of the lodges of the new system. Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick, Duke Ernst of Gotha, Duke Karl August of Saxe-Weimar, Prince August of Saxe-Gotha, Prince Carl of Hesse, Baron Daiberg, 2 the philosopher Herder, the poet Goethe, 3 the educationist Pestalozzi, 4 were among the number enrolled. By the end of 1784 the leaders boasted of a total enrollment of between two and three thousand members, 5 and the establishment of the order upon a solid foundation seemed to be fully assured. 1 l ln its efforts to obtain a decisive triumph over rival systems of Freemasonry, substantial progress had been made. At Munich, the Secret Chapter of the dominant Masonic fraternity in that city capitulated to the new system. At Vienna, Masons eagerly enrolled as Illuminati with a view to blocking the attempt of the Rosicrucians to extend the hegemony of that branch. The important general congress of Freemasons, held at Wilhelmsbad, in July, 1782, for the purpose of arriving at some conclusion concerning the claims of rival systems, yielded to the Illuminati a double advantage: the pretensions of the Order of the Strict Observance, its most dangerous rival, were disallowed and the opportunity which the congress offered in the form of a field for winning new recruits was adroitly seized by representatives of the Illuminati, with the result that its emissaries retired from the congress completely satisfied. Further, the Order of the Illuminati had apparently put itself on the high road to a complete victory in the Masonic world by securing the enlistment of the two most important personages in German Freemasonry, Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick and Prince Carl of Hesse. The full extent of the order’s conquests among the various branches of Masonry is impossible of full and accurate statement, for the principal reason which Engel gives : ” Nur wenige Dokumente existieren als Nachweis, denn es ist naturlich, dass solche in der Verfolgungszeit in Bayern vernichtet wurden, um nicht verdachtigt zu werden und aussere Verbindungen ziemlich schroff abgebrochen wurden, als sich die Skandalsucht erhob und dem Orden und deren Leiter all erdenlichen Schlechtigkeiten andichtete. Im Laufe der Zeit sind dann die betreffenden Schriften von den Logen als minderwertig missachtet und beseitigt worden, so dass eine Aufklarung heute ungemein erschwert ist.” (Op. cit., pp. 349 et seq.) Still, Forestier, in his chapter on “L’ Action sur les Loges Allemandes” (pp. 343-388), from which the foregoing isolated facts are drawn, gathers together a very considerable body of evidence, all tending to show that Illuminated Freemasonry was permitted to enjoy a very gratifying, though brief, period of prosperity. < French Revolution May 5, 1789 – Nov 9, 1799 On May 1, 1813, N.M.J. Charles Theodore, Elector of Bavaria p 175 On June 22, 1784, Carl Theodore 2 launched the first of his edicts against all communities, societies, and brotherhoods in his lands which had been established without due authorization of law and the confirmation of the sovereign. p 177 Having surrendered himself completely to the spirit of reaction, and spurred by reports of the covert disobedience of the order which his entourage spread before him, 2 the Bavarian monarch, on March 2 of the following year, issued another edict that specifically designated the Illuminati as one of the branches of Freemasonry, all of which were severely upbraided for their failure to yield implicit obedience to the will of the sovereign as expressed in the previous edict, and a new ban, more definite and sweeping in its terms than the former, was thereby proclaimed. XXXXXXXXX His imagination having taken heat from his reflections upon the attractive power of the Eleusinian mysteries and the influence exerted by the secret cult of the Pythagoreans, it was first in Weishaupt’s thought to seek in the Masonic institutions of the day the opportunity he coveted for the propagation of his views. From this original intention, however, he was soon diverted, in part because of the diffi- culty he experienced in commanding sufficient funds to gain admission to a lodge of Masons, in part because his study of such Masonic books as came into his hands persuaded him that the ” mysteries “of Freemasonry were too puerile and too readily accessible to the general public to make them worth while. 1 He deemed it necessary, therefore, to launch out on independent lines. He would form a model secret organization, comprising ” schools of wisdom,” concealed from the gaze of the world behind walls of seclusion and mystery, wherein those truths which the folly and egotism of the priests banned from the public chairs of education might be taught with perfect freedom to susceptible youths. 1 Forestier, op. cit., p. 28. Weishaupt readily detected the disparate character of current Freemasonry, and for a brief time he was en- thusiastic over the project of developing a rarified type of Masonry to which only men of superior talents should be admitted. For the reasons given, the idea was abandoned. MMMMMMMMMM
WARNING: Possible minefield ahead

 

Zeus

PART II. CUT & PASTE


What follows are fragments of text pulled from older versions of the author’s work, sometimes WRITTEN IN THE FIRST PERSON. These fragments vary anywhere from a brief note to entire sections. Please remember that each Cut & Paste is from OLD, UNEDITED WORK that may include anything from inadvertent errors to DANGEROUSLY MISLEADING CONCLUSIONS that desperately need to be rewritten. “For precept must be upon precept, precept upon precept; line upon line, line upon line; here a little, and there a little.” The reader must exercise some beyond this point.

 

 


№ 1: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 2: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 3: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 4: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 5: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 6: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 7: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 8: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 9: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 10: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 11: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 12: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 13: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 14: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 15: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 16: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 17: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 18: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 19: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 20: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 21: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 22: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 23: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 24: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


№ 25: Cut & Paste

PASTE HERE


Allegorical painting of Queen Elizabeth I with figures symbolizing Father Time and Death (c. 1610) [Credit: Wikimedia Commons]

 

Research Notes


XXX

  • List items