DIVINE SIMPLICITY: Simple English gematria, prime numbers, numeric symbolism, the missing Bacon cipher, and how the Rosicrucians communicate

The AA in the First Folio is 11, the 5th prime, representing the millennia-old struggle between the banking class (the former Roman elite) and the Ћinkers, who began life in this world as the ancient Greeks. That is not some poetic tripe on the part of the author. That is the reality of the world in which you live. We are not “Pawns in the Game.” We are cannon fodder for the bankers who, generation after generation, punish the people when the Ћinkers do something they don’t like, such as the White Ash Mine disaster, which killed a very important New York City banker. Why did the Rosicrucian do that? To slow down the banking class in their effort to build the multi-trillion dollar tunnel system in the Pikes Peak batholith and to remind them that their opposition is eternally vigilant.

 

Profound truths can be learned by studying Simple English gematria and the missing Bacon cipher discussed on this page. San Fernando de Béxar is now San Antonio, and what you are looking at is a confirmation that it was founded by the Rosicrucians. Why? Because 111 is the addition of the primes used to identify Queen Elizabeth (58) and her son, Sir Francis Bacon (53). Of course, the author offers historical proof that Bacon left for the Americas after feigning his death, but the simple English gematria value for “San Fernando” is not a coincidence.

Introduction


Understanding how the Rosicrucians communicate does not require a knowledge of advanced mathematics or a lifetime of reading obscure, intentionally obfuscated, and essentially meaningless texts. Most numeric signatures are nothing more than identifying marks letting you know who did something. The “signature of death” on the original World Trade Center is one of many such numeric signatures. It was put there by the Rosicrucian architect in Japan who designed the original World Trade Center. This is one of the most important numerical signatures of all time.

222 + 43 + 9 + 48 = 322

And now, because of this simple math equation, the intent of the banking class to destroy the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, will be known forever in this world and the next. Destroying the World Trade Center did nothing to hide the signature of death. It will always be there for anyone to see. The language of numeric symbols is the very definition of simplicity. It is not complicated for a reason. When people are looking for and expect to find complexity, simplicity is the best camouflage. That is the true genius of what Sir Francis Bacon did. Thoroughly understanding how this particular method of communication could remain hidden for over 400 years requires some explanation, but the “cipher” is as simple as “banker” = 51. Your child can understand this. And that is divine simplicity.

The meaningless, even number 124 value of “Rosicrucian” in the Elizabethan England cipher may confirm the switch to the switch to the 26-letter alphabet of Modern English announced in the highly unusual typesetting of “ALL’S Well thatEnds Well,” but to stop looking at the 24-letter, Elizabethan England value for a word or phrase when studying the Rosicrucians would be a mistake. Such values are occasionally used, usually when the communication says something about Elizabethan England. That is why you will always see all three ciphers in the author’s analysis of a word or phrase.

The name “Rosicrucian” dictates using the modern 26-letter alphabet


The language of numeric symbols is based on the simple English gematria of 26-letter Modern English. The author will show how the highly unusual typesetting for the title of the play “ALL’S Well thatEnds Well” announced that change to the 26-letter alphabet of Modern English, but even if you didn’t know this, the simple English gematria of “Rosicrucian” would be enough to know the change was made before the founding of the Rosicrucians. The name “Rosicrucian” was meaningless in Elizabethan English, but this is William Shakespeare we are talking about. The Bard and his men knew the English language would have 26 letters. They made it happen. This change from the gematria of 24-letter Elizabethan England (“Old English”) to the 26-letter alphabet of Modern English was anticipated by them and helped to camouflage their communication in the early days. Can you see not see how this 130 is reflected in the following?

…our Axiomata shall
unmovably remain
unto the Worlds End

But to be sure of what the author is saying, let us look at one more term dear to the Rosicrucians.

Rosy Cross is used in the First Folio to identify Sir Francis Bacon as the author of the Shakespearean plays. This should end any discussion about the Rosicrucians deciding on the 26-letter alphabet of Modern English before the foundation of the Rosicrucians.

The numeric symbolism of the Rosicrucians cannot be understood without an intimate knowledge of Elizabethan England history. You may not have enough time to do this, but you can pay attention to what the author is saying about the origins of the Rosicrucians in Elizabethan England. Just by doing that, you will learn most of what you need to know.

 

WARNING: Possible minefield ahead

 

Zeus

PART II. CUT & PASTE


What follows are fragments of text pulled from older versions of the author’s work, sometimes WRITTEN IN THE FIRST PERSON. These fragments vary anywhere from a brief note to entire sections. Please remember that each Cut & Paste is from OLD, UNEDITED WORK that may include anything from inadvertent errors to DANGEROUSLY MISLEADING CONCLUSIONS that desperately need to be rewritten. “For precept must be upon precept, precept upon precept; line upon line, line upon line; here a little, and there a little.” The reader must exercise some beyond this point.

 

 


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Allegorical painting of Queen Elizabeth I with figures symbolizing Father Time and Death (c. 1610) [Credit: Wikimedia Commons]

 

Research Notes


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